Repurposing a Post on Accredited in Public Relations

By Edward M. Bury, APR aka The PRDude

Here’s one of my favorite words, and for that matter, practices:  “Repurpose.”

The online Merriam Webster Dictionary defines the word this way: “To give a new purpose or use to;” and cites as an example, “finding ways to repurpose old computer equipment.”

On Wednesday of this week, I had the honor of having a post published in CommPro.biz, an electronic newsletter for those of us in the public relations and communications industry. The newsletter arrives in my mailbox each day and offers some great blogs and articles from communicators. The subjects range from the global — the News Corporation scandal and meltdown — to the more provincial.

My post certainly falls in the latter category.  It tackled a subject very close to my heart: The Accredited in Public Relations (APR) program.

Look up at my “byline,” and you’ll see I’m Accredited.  And, those loyal readers out there know I’ve covered Accreditation a few times through this blog.  And, I’m a member of the Universal Accreditation Board, which grants, administers and markets the credential.

It was in my role as co-chair of the UAB’s Marketing Communications work group that I received the offer to contribute to CommPro.biz.  The subject: The second quarter statistics for those pursuing the APR.  Interested in reading my thoughts?  Click here. I won’t spoil the fun by letting you know the subject.

I just checked the CommPro.biz post and was thrilled to see eight comments.  Well, nine because I just added one.

I’m bullish on Accreditation; that’s why I repurposed the post.  But this just struck me: Since I wrote the post as a member of the Universal Accreditation Board, perhaps I was not giving enough weight to the commentary.  Maybe the discussion of Accreditation — the only credential in the public relations arena — ranks up there with the News Corporation debacle.

What do you think?

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