Like My Tomato Plants, The Chicago Cubs Are Still Alive

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

tomatoes

Look close. There are some tomatoes still growing in my backyard this last day of October. For some inexplicable reason, I’m equating late season tomatoes to the Cubs’ hopes of winning the next two games in Cleveland.

Like the four tomato plants still yielding fruit on this last day of October 2016, my beloved Chicago Cubs are still in the chase to win the World Series of baseball.

Okay, I admit that’s a goofy, wacky, somewhat nonsensical mixed metaphor.  But it’s the best I can do after a wild, emotionally-charged weekend following the Cubs versus Indians via television, radio and handheld device.

Yes, the Cubs played their last home games of 2016 and head east and — hopefully — will return as World Series champions.

While I didn’t get to attend a playoff game at Wrigley Field, I of course watched, listened and read all things Cubs.

However, now that the action has shifted to Progressive Field in Cleveland, there are a few things about following the Cubs World Series quest I will not miss:

  1. Flashes of John Cusack, Eddie Vedder, Bill Murray and other celebrity Cub fans on the TV screen during games. Heck, I just read that Lady Gaga was at the game last night! Who cares? Not me.
  2. Seeing images of that frumpy — unquestionably rich — guy in the pink cap and green shirt with the awesome first row seats right behind home plate. Who is this guy and why doesn’t he stand up and root for the Cubs once in a while?
  3. Reading reports about bars in “Wrigleyville” (silly name, if you ask me) charging $250 or so to watch a game. Oh yes, you get beer and hot dogs. Can you say, “take advantage of the situation.”

So, why draft this post?  Well, we’ve failed to attract any more trick or treaters this Halloween night, and I need something Cubs related to do.

But on second thought, my analogy between tomatoes in November and the Cubs in the World Series does have merit. I don’t recall ever having a tomato yield in the 11th month of the year. And, to my knowledge, the Cubs have never won a game in November.

So there: As long as there are tomatoes still struggling to grow and ripen, the Cubs have a chance to win two more games in 2016.

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The Chicago Cubs and a Reflection on the World and Society Today

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Let’s leave the current on-field performance of the Chicago Cubs in the 2016 National League Championship Series with the Los Angeles Dodgers to those communicators who get paid — and know a lot more than I do about sports — to offer commentary.

Rest assured Mr. Kaminsky, your childish actions may come back to haunt you.

Rest assured Mr. Kaminsky, your childish actions may come back to haunt you.

As of this writing, the Cubs are down two games to one, have been shut out the past two games and appear to have lost heart and how to win. But there’s a game tonight!

Anyway, this post will focus more on the state of our world and society today, rather than Chicago’s National League baseball franchise.  What prompted this post is an article from the Redeye, a free tabloid published by the Chicago Tribune Media Group and geared to the Millennial demographic.

The article centers on a “fan” of the Chicago White Sox, a Chicago area native named Frank Kaminsky, who is taking his self-professed hatred of the Cubs to an extreme, childish level. As noted in this Redeye piece published today, Mr. Kaminsky — a professional basketball player with the Charlotte Hornets — promises to wear a custom-made Cubs jersey bearing the name of a man who was never a Cubs player until the team is eliminated from the playoffs.

Providing of course, that happens.

As noted in the Redeye piece: “It’s my stance, how I feel about the Cubs this year. I don’t want them to win.” He also has launched an “attack” of sorts in the Twittersphere.

So what do Mr. Kaminsky’s actions have to do with the much larger perspective?

It’s a demonstration of a lot of things that are wrong with the world today.  Here are a few:

  • It’s Okay, No Cool, to Hate. Rarely a day goes by when we don’t hear of an atrocity in war-torn places overseas and in my home city of Chicago. To me, it’s hate that drives people to kill and hurt others. Why should hate be part of sports? Because, apparently to some, it’s appropriate and it’s become part of “cheering on” your team.
  • The “Power” of the Digital Arena. This blog, is, of course, part of modern online communications. I’ve published what I believe are informative, fair and ethical posts.  Others use the digital arena to spread lies and inflame hatred.
  • The Ability to Change the Conversation.  What’s happening in baseball today? The NLCS and the ALCS. With garbage news like Mr. Kaminsky’s rants, part of the focus of real sports news gets mixed up with nonsense that’s taking place off the field of play.
  • Continue to Bash Bartman. I can’t believe that anyone with any sense of scruples would continue to slander Steve Bartman, a fan who tried to catch a foul ball in a game 13 years ago. He did nothing wrong, but weak, petty cowards still hold him responsible for a Cubs collapse.

Cub fans and many in Chicago fly the “W” flag to promote and support the team.  So, fly the “L” flag Mr. Kaminsky, if you want.

But in my mind you’re the loser.

 

Hey Hagar the Horrible: You Got Public Relations Right the First Time

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Okay. What’s “wrong” with the two cartoons that accompany this post?

hagar

Note to comic artist Chris Browne: I really am a fan of the “Hagar” strip. Source: Hagar the Horrible.

Need more clarification? What needs to be addressed and challenged from a public relations perspective?

First, some background on these “Hagar the Horrible“commentaries should will help.

The top strip was published six years ago.  In fact I wrote about it in this post from January of 2010, where I somehow merged an idea of how an example used in the upcoming State of the Union speech by President Barack Obama and the comic message from artist Chris Browne supported public relations.

(Yes, I’ve been known to steer the discussion of public relations down some truly divergent paths on occasion. But hey, it’s my blog.)

Back to the image.  The story in the top strip depicts a public relations consultant questioning a nobleman on the performance of Hagar and his viking raiding party following a pillage. This is good, because as we know, effective, strategic public relations is driven by research.

Now to the bottom strip, which appeared in the October 7 issue of the print version of the Chicago Tribune that’s delivered to our home each day.  Here, a disillusioned Hagar, hunched over a bar nursing a cocktail, seeks advice from friend Lucky Eddie on a source to “cook up a story” to mitigate past misgivings.

Well, Lucky Eddie says, the right person is at arm’s length away: The King’s Public Relations Director!

This is bad, because it infers — at least to me — that public relations tactics can mask unethical or perhaps even criminal actions through successful media relations. To many, Hagar is just trying to get some “good public relations” to solve his image problem.

Ah, Hagar, if it was only that easy.