Memorial Day 2017: A Perspective From a Changing Logan Sqaure

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Memorial Day 2017 dawned gloriously a few hours ago in Chicago, prompting a short excursion on foot through the somewhat deserted streets of our neighborhood.

This monument to fallen Logan Square heroes stands out amidst a changing neighborhood — and symbols of commerce.

Some advice: Take advantage of quiet times during holidays, especially those in the warm weather months, by strolling or biking in places familiar or new. You’d be surprised what may come to light in the hours you can claim as your own.

My walk today took me to the monument pictured in these images. It’s on Fullerton Avenue at Fransisco Avenue in Logan Square, and it honors those who lost their lives in “the great global war.”

There are 45 names on the now weathered bronze plaque at the base of the flag pole, which bears the U.S. stars and stripes and a flag honoring POWs.  Five red geraniums offer a little natural beauty, and someone later added a “V” for victory marker.

All of the names listed are men, save one, a woman (I presume) named La Donna.  All were residents of Logan Square around the turn of the 20th century, and all gave their lives in World War I.  All lived in a very different Logan Square.

Look close and you might be able to read all 45 names on this plaque.

Within steps of the monument, one can readily ascertain how the neighborhood has changed: A new cannabis dispensary, a hip coffee shop, a ramen noodle restaurant, art galleries and bars designed look like someone’s hideout.

In a sense, these American heroes — and the many who were killed over the decades while on duty — helped preserve the democracy that allows a neighborhood like Logan Square and others in Chicago and elsewhere to evolve and nurture these new business enterprises.

To some, bars that sell $8 glasses of beer and restaurants offering $14 bowls of soup are examples of gentrification; but from another perspective, it’s an example of the free-market economy we, as Americans, enjoy.

I hope others visit this little Logan Square monument this Memorial Day, even for a few minutes.  Then, patronize the local establishments, those made possible through the unselfish valor of others who lived here long ago.

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The PRDude has addressed Memorial Day in other posts:

 

 

 

 

 

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See You in September: Spring English Master’s Class Remembered

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Earlier this month, I completed another step toward my quest to add some other letters after my name, specifically “MA” for Master’s in English.

The next leg of the journey will be in the fall. So, yes, to quote the ‘70s Alice Cooper song, “school’s out for summer!”

Or more precisely, the Spring 2017 semester is over, and I can enjoy 90-plus days without having to read a book just about every 10 days.

Image of Nabokov courtesy of gunsmithcat.deviantart.com. So what does this image signify? The author liked butterflies and wrote a book about a girl he named Lolita.

The 16-week course I completed focused on the writings of Russian/American author Vladimir Nabokov and other writers influenced by this legend of modern prose. Must say the class was very challenging, as I grappled at times with comprehending Nabokov’s themes and motifs. (Although I failed to fully comprehend why Nabokov would pursue the story line in Lolita and how he got away with changing narrators in some works.)

I learned a lot from our cool, engaging youngish professor, but also by observing some of my fellow classmates. Four are profiled here, identified by names I conjured up in a state of creativity.

The Jolly Scholar: A young fellow fellow clearly enraptured by literature, this colleague regularly shared keen knowledge of the assigned reading, espousing thoughts with a wit and wisdom beyond is years. An example of his commitment: He re-read Madame Bovery — a work not assigned — to be better prepared for the discussion on Flaubert’s Parrot.  Now, that’s dedication!

Slouching Girl: Clearly an intelligent person, this young woman demonstrated by her body language that she probably would have preferred to be elsewhere than in class. Consistent hair twirling gestures added to her mystique. Yet, when she did contribute, the thought added greatly to the class discussion; however, I had challenges comprehending comments due to her subdued, dulcet voice.

Goth Dude: Goth Dude looked like he just returned from a Cure concert, always sporting black attire and combat boots, always brooding. (I trust if there was a darker color of clothing available, he would have worn it.) But in all fairness, this guy shared very provocative insight and was the second smartest person in the room after the professor. Cool and staid, he consistently added thoughts to a notebook using precise penmanship.

The Marxist: Perhaps an uncalled for and unfair moniker, because I have no idea of this guy’s political ideologies. He was Russian, I believe, and he frequently defended his positions on Nabokovian (yes, this is a real school of thought among literary scholars) theory with a controlled fervor. For some reason, he favored t-shirts adorned with images of fictitious U.S. presidents and dead rock stars.

If you need more insight into why I’m pursuing an advanced degree, please read this post from July of 2016. By the way, I earned a B for the spring 2017 class — the grade I felt I deserved. My final paper can be found here.

So, what’s on the agenda for the fall 2017? Something a little less Nabokovian and more straightforward: Non-fiction writing workshop.

Okay Fast Company: Time to Slow Down and Listen

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

One general component of a public relations plan is some kind of “call to action.”

Image courtesy of truconversion.com.

Well, I maintain the public relations profession should rally to voice strong opposition to a recent article that claimed public relations was “failing.”

As you can ascertain, I found the piece, “Here’s What the PR Industry Is Failing,” to be inaccurate and totally void of any compelling reason to be published.

But the article was published May 1 by Fast Company and written by Bill Hankes, noted in copy below the article as “a longtime public relations veteran” and now founder of a startup “that helps journalists find the information they need to develop stories, some of which comes from PR professionals, but most of which doesn’t.”

(A question: How much is “most of which” as noted above?)

The crux of Mr. Hankes’ thesis here: Services used to disseminate communications initiated by public relations professionals are “outdated” and “facilitate bad behavior.”

Rather than attempt to bash Mr. Hankes and Fast Company for spreading erroneous and unsubstantiated commentary, I’ll take the high road of sorts.

(To step off the high road for a short time, Mr. Hankes: Refers to all of us in the profession as “publicists;” neglects to note that ethical, effective public relations is driven by sound strategies; and, champions incorporation of unproven “newer technology” to replace what many in the industry use regularly.  I could go on, but will stop here.)

On to the high road. This kind of commentary only perpetuates the erroneous belief that public relations is purely publicity, or to use the old-school term, “press agentry.” Yes, there are publicists out there and perhaps some press agents, but those disciplines do not reflect modern public relations counsel.

Back to the call to action, I would encourage all serious PR professionals to take every relevant opportunity to educate clients, friends, the person sitting next to you at the coffee bar, about the full scope of services we provide.

I’d be glad to discuss with Mr. Hankes, should he be interested.

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Full Disclosure: I learned of this article from a Facebook post made by Gerry Corbett, APR, a “major PR dude” featured in this space back in January of 2013. Thanks, Gerry.