“That’s Ireland,” The Nation in Images

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Of course, you would expect images of the Emerald Isle to show lots of green. And, indeed, we saw many verdant places on our trip, from city parks to pastures to seaside cliffs.

In this “part two” post of our trip to Dublin and parts beyond, you’ll see lots of green; but you’ll also get a perspective on the culture of Ireland and its people. (Here’s the link to “part one,” which has some images but more insight.)

Below are images of places you’d expect — pubs, the coastline, castles — and places you might not expect — a notorious prison and the outside of a discount store. But collectively, they represent the Ireland we encountered over nine days travelling by foot, bus, train and streetcar.

On a walk to the DART Sandymount station, I noticed a plaque on this handsome home. Looking closer, I learned it’s the boyhood home of famous Irish poet William Butler Yeats.

The Clayton Ballsbridge Hotel, built as an orphanage in 1881, was our home base. Lots of character and history.

The Dublin Horse Show was attended by thousands over its four-day run. Even non-equestrians would have been impressed.

The history of Ireland has its dark, dark sides, too. Here’s the inside of the Kilmainham Gaol, a prison built in 1796. It housed men, women and even children over the centuries. Now it’s a museum, and U2 filmed a video there.

Of course, there are lots and lots of cool pubs in Dublin. And, like this one in Temple Bar, they’re easy to find. Not sure whether the guy at bottom left wanted to be in the frame.

 

 

 

 

Sincerely doubt this was named after me. And, we not stop in for a pint. Bet I would have been treated like royalty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The seaside town of Howth had lots of waterfront to explore, a tremendous old church and castle and, of course, great pubs. But my favorite part was the cliffs.

 

 

 

 

Of course I had a pint of Guinness while in Ireland. The one depicted here was hoisted during an awesome lunch of seafood chowder and crab claws in Howth.

Yes, Ireland has some spectacular castles. This one is in Malahide, a charming town along the coast. As you can ascertain, this is a real castle.

Not to diminish this more modest structure we saw in Dalkey. It’s a castle, all right. But more of a “starter” castle.

One day, we visited Belfast in Northern Ireland, still part of the United Kingdom. Yes, they’re on the British pound. This retailer is akin to our Dollar General.

The Crown Liquor Saloon (or the Crown Bar) is a Belfast treasure and part of the National Trust. Susan would concur: You will not find a cooler drinking establishment anywhere.

Looking west on May Street, Belfast does exude its British heritage. Those towers sit atop City Hall, which has a museum devoted to the city’s artists and statesmen and women.

On our visit to Galway, we encountered outstanding buskers or street musicians, like this guy, in the Latin Quarter. Look close and you’ll find Chicago among the sister cities listed on the mural.

A stroll through Galway had its magical moments. And, a visit to a local pub seemed to enhance the experience. Hey, we were in Ireland!

Galway’s a coastal town along the Atlantic Ocean. Caught a glimpse of these vessels at low tide.

 

On our final day in Ireland, I found solace and solitude along this beach in Malahide. No surfers or sun bathers, just sky, water and sand.

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