Finding Solace on This Day in America

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

The music from this trio helped me cope with the tragedies that took place in two American cities.

Grappling with the horrific news from El Paso, then Dayton, I sought some way to find consolation on this glorious, sunny summer day in early August.

My decision was simple: Walk and think.  And, seek out something here in our Chicago neighborhood that would provide some kind of comfort, some kind of remedy for the anguish I felt at yet another unconscionable action in America.

My stroll took me along Milwaukee Avenue, a thoroughfare reflecting the changes in Logan Square, now home to modern apartment towers and upscale restaurants.

Observing the new business and edifices along this once utilitarian street helped take my mind off the carnage I saw on television reports.

I made my way to the popular Logan Square Farmer’s Market, one of the largest and most vibrant in the city. Enjoying a coffee and the always-packed New Wave Coffee adjacent to the Farmer’s Market, here’s what I witnessed: Patrons purchasing vegetables and artisan wares, couples holding hands, couples walking dogs, people lining up to purchase tacos.

In essence, life continuing.

Making my way toward the main row of vendors on the Logan Boulevard parkway, I enjoyed a few songs from a trio performing Americana roots music. Their sound was inviting, genuine and uncluttered.

For a while, I forgot about what I learned from television news reports Saturday and this morning.

I walked home feeling relieved and in a better state of mind.

Back in 2012, I commented on the mass shooting of teachers and kids in Connecticut. At that time, I predicted this gun-driven madness would probably happen again.

Oh, how I wish I was wrong.

 

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Just What Constitutes a “Cheap” Story These Days?

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Just about every profession has its jargon — words or phrases unique to those in that industry.

Determining that a news story was "cheap" exemplifies the jargon used in the news business.

Determining that a news story was “cheap” exemplifies the jargon used in the news business.

That certainly was the case when I worked many years ago as a reporter, writer and editor at the City News Bureau of Chicago, the long-gone, unquestionably legendary local wire service.

I recall directives from the city desk editor to “sub out” (write a concluding story based on updated information) a news event that happened earlier.  Or, the desk would order me to write “two books” (a reference to the stationery we used to type out copy — a main sheet followed by three sheets of paper with carbon paper in between) on proceedings that took place that day at Criminal Courts.

And, there was the decision to label a story as being “cheap,” or meaning it didn’t have a lot of sustaining news value.

Fires, burglaries, robberies, accidents and yes, even homicides, could be “cheap” and then “cheaped out,” or not worthy of more reporting and distribution of a subsequent story over the wire.

These days, some stories that would have been considered “cheap” in the late 1970s have dominated the news, and for good reason.

I’m referring to those related to the number of maddeningly persistent and seemingly uncontrollable shootings that have taken place in Chicago these past few years.

Perhaps things would be a lot better if this was the only type of gun available?

Perhaps things would be a lot better if this was the only type of gun available?

I couldn’t find statistics from the years I covered police, fire and courts for City News, but this Chicago Tribune web page graphically illustrates the sad truth about the numbers of people shot here in 2015 and so far this year.

Grim, isn’t it? Nearly 3,000 people shot last year and more than 300 shot during the first six weeks of 2016.

One recent shooting, one that may have been “cheaped out” years ago hopefully will galvanize Chicago — its people, its elected officials, its police — to work collectively to halt the shootings plaguing the city.

Last week, a 16-year-old girl on her way to school was shot in the leg, the victim of a horrific morning exchange of gun play near her home in West Humboldt Park.  Fortunately, she survived, but of course, she’ll have to live with the physical and emotional scars forever.

My friend Juan operated a store at this location until he was shot and killed there one fall evening.

My friend Juan operated a store at this location until he was shot and killed there one fall evening.

My friend Juan was not so fortunate.  Juan (I’ll keep his last name confidential) operated a small convenience store across from our home. He worked 16 hours a day, every day, until one Sunday evening in October of 2007 when someone shot and killed Juan inside the store.

To my knowledge, no one has been charged in Juan’s murder; his store was closed years ago.

Back in the 1970s, there were lots of “cheap” shootings and other kinds of crime. I’d like to think we — as a society — would have learned the value of life and the devastation caused by guns during those many years.