Memorial Day 2017: A Perspective From a Changing Logan Sqaure

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Memorial Day 2017 dawned gloriously a few hours ago in Chicago, prompting a short excursion on foot through the somewhat deserted streets of our neighborhood.

This monument to fallen Logan Square heroes stands out amidst a changing neighborhood — and symbols of commerce.

Some advice: Take advantage of quiet times during holidays, especially those in the warm weather months, by strolling or biking in places familiar or new. You’d be surprised what may come to light in the hours you can claim as your own.

My walk today took me to the monument pictured in these images. It’s on Fullerton Avenue at Fransisco Avenue in Logan Square, and it honors those who lost their lives in “the great global war.”

There are 45 names on the now weathered bronze plaque at the base of the flag pole, which bears the U.S. stars and stripes and a flag honoring POWs.  Five red geraniums offer a little natural beauty, and someone later added a “V” for victory marker.

All of the names listed are men, save one, a woman (I presume) named La Donna.  All were residents of Logan Square around the turn of the 20th century, and all gave their lives in World War I.  All lived in a very different Logan Square.

Look close and you might be able to read all 45 names on this plaque.

Within steps of the monument, one can readily ascertain how the neighborhood has changed: A new cannabis dispensary, a hip coffee shop, a ramen noodle restaurant, art galleries and bars designed look like someone’s hideout.

In a sense, these American heroes — and the many who were killed over the decades while on duty — helped preserve the democracy that allows a neighborhood like Logan Square and others in Chicago and elsewhere to evolve and nurture these new business enterprises.

To some, bars that sell $8 glasses of beer and restaurants offering $14 bowls of soup are examples of gentrification; but from another perspective, it’s an example of the free-market economy we, as Americans, enjoy.

I hope others visit this little Logan Square monument this Memorial Day, even for a few minutes.  Then, patronize the local establishments, those made possible through the unselfish valor of others who lived here long ago.

* * *

The PRDude has addressed Memorial Day in other posts: