A # of ?s RE: “AOC”

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

A rebuttal to the headline and the article itself: It’s you, you, you the media that has elevated this freshman legislator to such exulted status!

Without question, abbreviations, grammatical shortcuts and emojis continue to find a strong and increasingly dominant place in today’s communications landscape, especially in the digital and broadcast mediums.

Based on the image at left, a photo capturing an article with photo I read in today’s Chicago Tribune, this practice of somewhat bastardizing the language clearly is fully ensconced in print.

The issue for me here: Since her meteoric rise on the national political scene, U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, (D-NY) is now better known by her initials.

Note the copy of the Tribune article displayed. The Congresswoman’s initials are in the headline, and they are used repeatedly throughout the piece!  As a former reporter, I have to scream: Just what the heck is going on here?  How is this being allowed in what I would label “serious” journalism?

Want more? Read the full story from reporter David Bauder, writing for the Associated Press.

As inferred in the headline to this post, I have questions — actually lots of questions — regarding this grammatical cultural phenomenon.

In no particular order, they are:

  • How did the “AOC” abbreviation originate? Who first coined it and perpetrated it?
  • Why is this practice accepted in journalism?
  • Why did Mr. Bauder refer to the Congresswoman as “AOC” multiple times in the article?
  • Why did Mr. Bauder’s editors allow this practice, clearly an assault to sound journalism practices?
  • Does the Congresswoman get preferential treatment because she’s embodied in initials?
  • Is this practice beneficial? Harmful?
  • Can anyone strategically craft a political campaign that results in being referenced primarily by initials or abbreviations?
  • If I’m re-branded as “EMB” or “TPRD,” will my life change for the better?

I wholeheartedly wish Representative Ocasio-Cortez much success in representing her district and serving the American people.  She’s the face of the so-called Green New Deal (or, perhaps GND?), and her future is promising, even if she’ll never be invited as a guest on Fox & Friends or Hannity.

To conclude, throughout our nation’s history, other politicians have been known by their initials — FDR, JFK and LBJ come to mind.  But the aforementioned were elected president, for gosh sake!  They earned it. As of this writing, AOC has held her post officially only since January 3 of this year. That’s a total of 70 days.

Opps. Read what I just wrote.

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One Image, One Question: February 23, 2016

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Today the PRDude blog debuts a new concept: Sharing one image followed by a question that (hopefully) will encapsulate the meaning behind the image and inspire your thoughts and comments.

First, some background on the image below. It was taken this afternoon on one of my regular after-lunch walks through the neighborhood near the university where I work. The location is Mary Bartelme Park, a terrific urban spot located in the rapidly gentrifying West Loop neighborhood of Chicago. Please visit if you’re seeking a quiet place to relax.

The weather was warm for late February, the skies sunny.  The image was taken with my Samsung Avant handheld, and only cropped a little.

The image:

Dog park

 

The question: Why can’t people act more like dogs?

The four-legged animals shown here — dogs of many breeds, of various sizes — were in a confined area enjoying each other the way dogs do: Running, chasing and checking each other out.

There was not an incident of anger, violence or contempt. I did not observe any weapons drawn or used. To my knowledge, nothing of value was stolen — from people or the dogs.  (There was a spirited chase for a ball, however.)

The dogs all accepted each other.

Let’s juxtapose what I observed on my walk today with a few things happening in other parts of the world.

So, a follow up question to the one above: If dogs can be at peace and respect each other, why can’t people?

Your thoughts?

 

The USA Still a Work in Progress

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Yesterday, President Obama delivered the State of the Union address, his final such speech on the condition of the nation and its future.

Actually, I was in Washington while the President delivered the address to Congress, the rest of the nation and world.

And, no, I was not invited to attend and I would have respectfully declined had I received an invitation. I was in the nation’s capital to attend a transportation conference on behalf of the university where I work.

Photography is not allowed inside the National Archives Museum, but I did take this exterior image.

Photography is not allowed inside the National Archives Museum, but I did take this exterior image.

But, I have some thoughts about our nation, thoughts shaped by what I witnessed in Washington between meetings and education sessions on transportation. First, let me share what inspired this post.

During a break on Tuesday, I strolled a few blocks to the National Archives Museum on Pennsylvania Avenue; it was a cold day, and museum was not crowded, save for some school kids on a field trip and a handful of visitors like myself.

Work continues on the National Mall. I found this symbolic to the nation as a whole.

Work continues on the National Mall. I found this symbolic to the nation as a whole.

There, in the museum Rotunda, is the document that set in motion our nation. Yes, the real Declaration of Independence, and I had the honor of spending a few minutes before it alone.

“Is this one of the originals?” I asked a nice man who was a volunteer docent.

“Original — it’s the only one,” he said, and then offered more insight on the Founding Fathers, who are depicted in spectacular paintings in the Rotunda.

Of course, there’s lots of historical sites in Washington, and lots of money is being spent to preserve our heritage. At the National Mall across Independence Avenue, I could see lots of construction underway to repair and improve America’s front yard.

Dressed for a cold late morning at DuPont Circle.

Dressed for a cold late morning at DuPont Circle.

During my visit, I stayed at a hotel on DuPont Circle, a wonderful neighborhood that’s home to embassies, great restaurants and galleries.  Around the Circle and in doorways on Connecticut Avenue, I saw another side of America, one beyond the great monuments and public spaces.

Men and women lived in cardboard boxes, draped in layers of coats and blankets to stay warm in the January cold.  Yes, this tragedy takes place in many other parts of America — including Chicago — besides Washington; but it was more poignant to witness it in the capital of the richest nation on earth.

Back to the State of the Union address: The President discussed what’s right with America and the accomplishments made during his administration. And, from another perspective, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley offered a rebuttal from the Republican party.

This is how politics works, here and in other democracies.

But I wonder if — for the sake of Americans living on the streets as well as those of us who have homes to go to at night — that the politics could be put aside so the problems facing the less fortunate can be solved.

I think that’s what the Founding Fathers meant by the often quoted “pursuit of happiness” segment.