One Image, One Question: August 9, 2016

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Way back in August of 1979, a scion of one of the most powerful and successful political families of the 20th century demonstrated the need to be prepared when put on the stage in search of the highest office in the land.

The scion: Then U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy, (D-Massachusetts), brother of a president and brother of senator who was running for president– both, as you know — assassinated.

Trump

Mr. Donald Trump, Republican candidate for president, do I have a question for you.

The situation: The Senator was being interviewed by CBS News reporter Roger Mudd on what should have been Kennedy’s chance to demonstrate why he deserved the Democratic nomination for president in the 1980 national elections. The interview took place in a safe and controlled environment: The Kennedy compound at Hyannis Port.

The question: “Why do you want to be president?”

The result: Senator Kennedy delivered a remarkably rambling, decidedly disconnected and certainly confusing response to Mudd’s simple question.

The outcome: Kennedy’s campaign was sunk. Sitting President Jimmy Carter was granted the Democratic nomination, but was trounced by Ronald Reagan.

(Read more from this online report, or view this video posted on YouTube.)

The relationship to the 2016 presidential race: Republican nominee Donald Trump, as you know, has been asked many questions since the campaign began last year, and unquestionably, he’s delivered some rambling, disconnected and confusing answers. But I’m not sure if Mr. Trump has been asked perhaps the most poignant question for any candidate running for president.

And, now for the question — pretty obvious I trust — and subject of today’s post:

Mr. Trump, why do you want to be president?

Throughout this often bizarre and contentious campaign, Mr. Trump has been asked a lot of questions, but I’ve not heard an interviewer pose the simple one above. Given his proclivity for bluster and bombast, I would guess Mr. Trump would not shrink and retreat in the manner as Senator Kennedy.

And, in the interest of fairness, I would pose the same question to Democrat Hillary Clinton. But I think we know what her answer would be.

 

 

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Trump + Public Relations = Scandal?

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

When candidates for the Republican nomination for president were jockeying for position last summer, I asked a friend what advice would he give to then long-shot Donald Trump.

how-much-donald-trump-makes-in-speaking-fees-compared-to-everyone-else

Presidential candidate and reported publicist Donald Trump. Image source: Business Insider.

My friend, a very experienced and accomplished public relations strategist, said, as I recall: “If I were to offer Mr. Trump counsel, I would advise him to start speaking on the issues and address why he’s qualified to hold the office of president.”

In the 10-plus months since that conversation, Mr. Trump has, indeed, spoken about a lot of things. Some, okay many, would argue that he really hasn’t tackled critical issues facing the nation — the economy, immigration, terrorism threats come to mind — in light of the fact he sure knows how to talk and has done so voraciously.

And, as to why he should be president: The candidate flaunts his business acumen and success as a builder of buildings and creator of jobs.

Another skill required by presidents is to interact effectively with the media. According to a report last week, Mr. Trump has practiced this skill by returning a reporter’s call in 1991 under the guise of a Trump publicist named John Miller.  And, on other occasions, he was publicist John Barron.

As a public relations professional who has done his fair share of media relations, I offer Mr. Trump this advice: Please refrain from posing as a member of the public relations community.

Doing so is unethical because it violates many accepted values and provisions established by the Public Relations Society of America,  like honesty and open disclosure of information for starters. Plus, it takes away billable hours from a real public relations guy or gal!

In another era, the “Trump-posing-as-publicist” story might have ended the candidacy.  It would have been a scandal.

Today, it’s just another chapter it what is culminating in one of the most bizarre and “spirited” political campaigns in history.

Think I’ll reach out to my friend and ask what counsel he’d provide presumed Republican nominee Trump now.