With Hours to Go, A Final Thought on April APR Month

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

With just a few hours left in April 2017, just a final though on efforts underway to promote the Accredited in Public Relations (APR) credential.

After all, April has been designated Accreditation Month, and those of us who earned the credential are somewhat responsible for its future. So, what can APRs do help keep the process advancing?

I offer this very simple suggestion: Serve as an APR Panel Presentation member.

As an APR, here’s what your participation in the Accreditation process will accomplish:

  • Demonstrate your commitment to the credential and profession.
  • Provide an opportunity to learn more about the current KSAs and revisions to the APR process.
  • Meet fellow APRs and candidates seeking the credential.
  • Earn maintenance points needed to retain your APR standing.

And, if another incentive is needed, think of this: When you pursued Accreditation, three APRs found the time and demonstrated the commitment to participate in the presentation you had to deliver to move to the next step in the process.

Yes, we’re all busy these days. But hopefully more APRs will find the hours needed to review a candidate’s Questionnaire, review the document and commit the two or so hours required for the Panel Presentation.

Please find the time in your career to let someone else have that opportunity. Prove your commitment to the value of Accreditation.

Now it’s your turn fellow Accredited professionals: What can we do to nurture and advance Accreditation?

After all, the road to Accreditation transcends one month.

 

 

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“Digital PR?” I Don’t Think So

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

Like many of us in the public relations profession, I subscribe to Help a Reporter Out (HARO), the online resource that provides those in the news media with a platform to enlist expert sources for their stories.

haro_90x78My goal: To identify media members seeking commentary on issues involving transportation, because that’s industry I work in at the moment. (An aside: Haven’t read any transportation-centered inquiries yet, but I’ll keep an eye out.)

Earlier this week, there was a public relations-related HARO message — one that caught my attention. The reporter was seeking insight on the use of “digital PR.”

That stopped me right in my tracks, and as an Accredited public relations professional who takes the profession seriously, I felt compelled to respond.

My message stated that there is no such thing as “digital PR.” There’s public relations — the communications practice — and there’s the use of digital resources as part of a strategic public relations program.

Apparently, there are practitioners who disagree with me, as I easily found online reports about “digital PR.” This commentary offered a definition:

Digital PR is all about combining traditional PR with content marketing, social media and search.

And, I found an agency that has “digital PR” in its name. However, I really can’t ascertain exactly what services this firm provides, because the content is in Italian.

Digital PR logoFinally, I identified a Florida marketing agency that has branded “digital PR” services. (NOTE: If the folks from this agency read my post, please check your website because the content under the “Born Digital” headline is clashing with the image of the hand holding the tablet.)

I could go on with examples, but here’s my concluding thoughts:

  • The public relations profession, which is based on building relationships through effective, ethical communications, will only get marginalized if those of us in the industry allow phrases like “digital PR” to become part of the lexicon.
  • Clients who enlist public relations professionals should be made aware that yes, digital communications has dramatically changed the playing field; but digital communications practices should be guided by the same principles and standards that guide “traditional” public relations.

Now it’s your turn: Is “digital PR” a separate management communications practice?

 

 

Now, After Me: I am an Accredited Public Relations Professional!

By Edward M. Bury, APR (aka The PRDude)

There was some spirited online debate last week on a subject that’s close to my heart: The Accreditation in Public Relations (APR) credential. The debate took place within the APR LinkedIn group and included comments from current and past members of the Universal Accreditation Board (UAB) and APRs at large.  As of this writing, there were 26 comments — a pretty good number.

aprlogoLet me get the disclosure stuff out of the way: The PRDude (make that Edward M. Bury) is Accredited, and I served on the UAB for two three-year terms. If you’ve read previous posts, you’re aware that I’m passionate about the credential. It was the best professional achievement I accomplished since earning a Bachelor’s degree a long time ago.

Here’s what sparked the debate: A current UAB member started the discussion with a comment stating that the Board would focus efforts in 2013 on achieving these three goals:

1) Conclude beta testing on the entry-level credential in public relations;
2) Enhance the value of APR to Accredited members; and
3) Revitalize the APR brand to external audiences with a heavy focus on the HR and business communities.

Comments from APRs (you have to hold the credential to be part of this LinkedIn group) were generally supportive. Some questioned the value for  the proposed entry-level credential, a development I knew about and wholeheartedly support. But some questioned whether the UAB should focus more towards more on items 2 and 3 from the above list, rather than allocate efforts toward #1.

I posted two comments because I wanted to make these points clear:

  • UAB members dedicate their time and allocate personal resources (okay, out-of-pocket expenses for most) to attend three or four meetings annually and conduct Board work at other times — just to manage, administer and market the Accreditation in Public Relations program.
  • Promoting the value of the credential has long been a focus — but it’s a challenging task give the fact the dollars needed for effective marketing just aren’t there.

That’s why I’m drafting this post.  I’m hoping all APRs — those who earned Accreditation prior to 2003 under the essay-focused process, and those like me who earned it when the program was re-engineered and built around a computer-based examination — will do their part and promote the credential whenever possible.  Let’s start with this virtual cheer:  “I am an Accredited Public Relations Professional!

Now, don’t you feel better?

APRs are expected to provide exceptional public relations counsel and adhere to high ethical standards every day we’re on the job. And, I trust that’s the case for just about every practitioner who holds the credential. But perhaps we don’t do a good enough job in communicating what those three letters stand for, why we earned them and what they mean to the industry.

Fellow APRs, make it a practice to promote Accreditation. There are around 5,000 professionals who are Accredited today. That’s a pretty substantial number of communicators; collectively, let’s make our voice heard. Blog about the impact Accreditation had on your career. Promote it on social media platforms. Be part of Accreditation training within your company or PRSA Chapter.

Now, it’s your turn: If you’re Accredited or have an opinion on how to raise awareness for the value of Accreditation, please share.